Books

18 July 2017

The Bourne Supremacy by Robert Ludlum, USA, 1986


 
This is the second of the three books in the Bourne series, and like the first book, The Bourne Identity, it is gripping for all of its almost 700 pages.



David Webb alias Jason Bourne alias Delta alias Cain is unwillingly pulled into a complicated and deadly fight against a Chinese megalomaniac whose eyes are firmly focused on controlling not only China and its supposed territories but even the entire world. Whereas the setting for The Bourne Identity was Europe and America, the setting for this second book is, after a brief opening in America, Hong Kong and China. As with the first book, where French phrases are cleverly scattered throughout, language plays an important role in creating atmosphere. In this case it is Mandarin, and although I do not speak a word of Mandarin the snippets of that language did not cause any confusion; on the contrary, it cements the story in the Far East.

http://www.famousauthors.org/robert-ludlum
The story is fast paced and suspenseful with a mixture of characters from the first book together with a number of new characters. At all times, the book is intelligent and extremely well researched and well planned. Numerous twists and turns can challenge the reader’s mental powers in the same way a big dipper might challenge a person’s physical and emotional stability, but when one has fastened one’s seat belt there is really no way of jumping off the ride.

Ludlum’s understanding and interpretation of the political situation in China (1980s) sheds light on the situation today, thirty years on. This is a book not to be missed, but to avoid confusion it should definitely be read after The Bourne Identity.


04 July 2017

The Tales of Beedle the Bard by J.K.Rowling, UK, 2008



This short work, comprising five tales for children, assumes some acquaintance with the Harry Potter books by the same author. Characters from these books are referred to in the tales, and it is assumed that the reader has already made their acquaintance. Moreover, each tale includes a critique by Professor Albus Dumbledore, who was the headmaster of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Mention of Professor Dumbledore’s prowess is made in the short preface to the book; however, for anyone unacquainted with the Harry Potter books this would probably not mean very much.


The book is actually referred to in one of the later Harry Potter Books, and the references and links between the tales and the actual Harry Potter books are very cleverly managed.


I have heard that the original book (The Tales of Beedle the Bard) – a limited edition of seven copies - was exquisitely handwritten and hand illustrated by Rowling. Each copy was beautifully bound in leather with silver embellishments and semiprecious stones. Six of these copies were given to people involved with the production of the Harry Potter series; the seventh was auctioned for charity (The Children’s Voice) and raised US$ 3.98 million.


Written primarily for children, this is an easily read book but still enjoyable, especially for those who are well acquainted with the Harry Potter books.


The photo of J.K.Rowling is from Daily Mail,  and the photo of the limited-edition book is from BBC